Boulder to DIA - $84-88

September 23, 2009

Finding a ride in Boulder

Filed under: Highlights — Skibare @ 11:18 am

of course dial our cell phones day or night, the night drivers phone numbers are listed UPPER right hand corner under NIGHT Drivers

during the daytime, 303 641-7829

and HOW about that APWR screaming north like I said…………..seems NO TAKERS for my FREE RIDES to DIA!

September 16, 2009

Driving my Taxi in Boulder

Filed under: Highlights — Skibare @ 8:49 am

why call central dispatch who has never been to Boulder???
call the cell phone (303) 641-7829

U might learn MORE about Wind Power than U bargained 4

hedge fund Managers an my Taxi

Filed under: Highlights — Skibare @ 8:48 am

boy, its NOT what ya know, its WHO U know or who gets inside your taxi

nice five day ROCKET on APWR

APWR Continues to Kick A$$

Filed under: Highlights — Skibare @ 8:47 am

geeez, loving the WIND of China

September 10, 2009

China Wind Stock APWR

Filed under: Highlights — Skibare @ 4:29 pm

once U figure out where I am coming from , one might be able to see where I am going………the world is coming to WIND POWER for China and the play in China to invest in for the next 10 years is APWR , which GE and the communist China government has also invested into for the long run and the health of China.

APWR is profitable, builds green power plants, and is a coming wind turbine maker monster in China being helped by GE and the Chinese government! We must go GREEN in CHINA or we all are going to die eventually quicker than later!

Even so, today 80 percent of China’s energy comes from burning coal, and only 0.4 percent from wind.

“China’s fossil energy consumption is so large that a large-scale conversion to renewable energy there is critical for addressing climate and air pollution problems,” said Mark Jacobson of Stanford University, who was not a part of the study.

The details of this study provides practical information that policymakers and developers can use, he added

Michael McElroy and colleagues at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., and Tsinghua University in Beijing estimated the potential for wind energy across China. They excluded unfavorable areas, such as those with high populations, dense forests or steep slopes.

They combined the resulting map of China’s wind energy potential with estimates of how expensive wind energy would be in different locations throughout the country.

There is well more than enough wind to provide all of China’s electricity needs, the researchers found. Earlier this year, they reported that wind could provide 18 times more energy than the 2005 demand.

By incorporating economic information in the new study, the group found that the 2030 electricity demand could be provided at a price of 0.516 yuan (7.6 U.S. cents) per kilowatt-hour of electricity.

“The price of 0.516 RMB per kilowatt-hour falls into the range of prices in existing wind projects in China,” study co-author Xi Lu of Harvard told Discovery News.

Developers of Chinese wind projects are guaranteed a price for power for an initial period — typically about 10 years — by the provincial governments as part of an up-front bidding process.

The team also calculated how much wind could be supplied at a price comparable to the price of coal-generated power, 0.4 RMB per kilowatt-hour. Even at this price, China could supply 23 percent of its 2030 electricity needs with wind, reducing its CO2 emissions by nearly 10 percent, about 2 percent of today’s global total.

Meeting the 2030 demand with wind power would not blanket the whole nation with windmills, Lu added. “It is estimated that wind farms only take up land areas of 0.5 million square kilometers (193,000 square miles), which is only three quarters the area of the state of Texas.”

What’s more, the turbines themselves only occupy about 2 percent of the land they stand on. “The lands do not necessarily lose their original functions, such as agricultural fields or pastures,” he said.

Going Long for the Year 2020 in China Wind Power

Filed under: Highlights — Skibare @ 4:26 pm

the reason U must go LONG for China Wind for the year 2020……….the MEGATREND is your freind and the trend is WIND Power 4 China! Time to go LONG APWR !

Even so, today 80 percent of China’s energy comes from burning coal, and only 0.4 percent from wind.

“China’s fossil energy consumption is so large that a large-scale conversion to renewable energy there is critical for addressing climate and air pollution problems,” said Mark Jacobson of Stanford University, who was not a part of the study.

The details of this study provides practical information that policymakers and developers can use, he added

Michael McElroy and colleagues at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., and Tsinghua University in Beijing estimated the potential for wind energy across China. They excluded unfavorable areas, such as those with high populations, dense forests or steep slopes.

They combined the resulting map of China’s wind energy potential with estimates of how expensive wind energy would be in different locations throughout the country.

There is well more than enough wind to provide all of China’s electricity needs, the researchers found. Earlier this year, they reported that wind could provide 18 times more energy than the 2005 demand.

By incorporating economic information in the new study, the group found that the 2030 electricity demand could be provided at a price of 0.516 yuan (7.6 U.S. cents) per kilowatt-hour of electricity.

“The price of 0.516 RMB per kilowatt-hour falls into the range of prices in existing wind projects in China,” study co-author Xi Lu of Harvard told Discovery News.

Developers of Chinese wind projects are guaranteed a price for power for an initial period — typically about 10 years — by the provincial governments as part of an up-front bidding process.

The team also calculated how much wind could be supplied at a price comparable to the price of coal-generated power, 0.4 RMB per kilowatt-hour. Even at this price, China could supply 23 percent of its 2030 electricity needs with wind, reducing its CO2 emissions by nearly 10 percent, about 2 percent of today’s global total.

Meeting the 2030 demand with wind power would not blanket the whole nation with windmills, Lu added. “It is estimated that wind farms only take up land areas of 0.5 million square kilometers (193,000 square miles), which is only three quarters the area of the state of Texas.”

What’s more, the turbines themselves only occupy about 2 percent of the land they stand on. “The lands do not necessarily lose their original functions, such as agricultural fields or pastures,” he said.

September 8, 2009

APWR, the Next First Solar of China

Filed under: Highlights — Skibare @ 9:45 am

guessing I wont be giving away any free rides anytime soon to any customers on my APWR offer of a free ride to DIA.

APWR is going to become the next First Solar of China as the street.com just copied my content on my wind blog but god love Cramer cause he can pump like a sailor on shore leave in the Phillippines!!! God love Ya Cramer for stealing my content!

but, First Solar rolling today also on a MOU to China

but, APWR has so much bigger fish to fry to get to $19 by XMAS

TEMPE, Ariz.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–First Solar today announced a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Chinese government to build a 2 gigawatt solar power plant in Ordos City, Inner Mongolia, China.

Business Wire – First Solar CEO Mike Ahearn greets Chairman Wu Bangguo of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress …

Related Quotes
Symbol Price Change
FSLR 133.14 +11.67

{“s” : “fslr”,”k” : “c10,l10,p20,t10″,”o” : “”,”j” : “”} Pursuant to the MOU, signed in the presence of Chairman Wu Bangguo of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress of China, the solar project in Ordos will be built over a multi-year period. Phase 1 will be a 30 megawatt demonstration project that will begin construction by June 1, 2010 and be completed as soon thereafter as practicable. Phases 2, 3 and 4 will be 100 megawatts, 870 megawatts, and 1,000 megawatts. Phases 2 and 3 will be completed in 2014 and Phase 4 will be completed by 2019.

“This major commitment to solar power is a direct result of the progressive energy policies being adopted in China to create a sustainable, long-term market for solar and a low carbon future for China,” First Solar CEO Mike Ahearn said at the signing ceremony. “We’re proud to be announcing this precedent-setting project today. It represents an encouraging step forward toward the mass-scale deployment of solar power worldwide to help mitigate climate change concerns.”

September 3, 2009

APWR Up 5% Today

Filed under: Highlights — Skibare @ 11:10 am

who says that whacky wind cab driver dont know what he is talking about??

Skibare

Humor, Taxi Cab Education on Wind Power

Filed under: Highlights — Skibare @ 11:09 am

as many of you know , I keep my internet name ””Skibare”’ as my last name is BARE and my passion is Skiing………so, ”’Skibare”’ is just a logical 12 year internet name I have held onto…………google Skibare if U want to see some of my past shenanigans

but, THIS is too funny, my APWR China Wind play, ie WE up 5% Today when Dow is doing NOTHING

5. Your wife wakes you from a dream and asks “Who is skibare, and why are you choking the dog?”

4. You bring your blackberry into the bathroom in the morning to see if the Thai deal has been announced.

3. When the doctor tells you “Let’s listen to that pumper” you wonder if he is a member at wind4me.com

2. You have actually considered flying to Boulder just for a free taxi ride.

And the #1 way to know you spend too much time on the APWR message board.. You have personally blamed Acker for everything from the cyst on your ass to the door ding you got in the walmart parking lot.

From Tnzalu on the Yahoo Message board! THANKS!

September 1, 2009

Taxi Rides in Boulder, Colorado

Filed under: Highlights — Skibare @ 4:23 am

its easy, dial the cell phones (303) 641-7829